Guest Picks: Amy Seimetz

Amy Seimetz Guest Picks

Sun Don’t Shine director and all-around indie It-girl Amy Seimetz shares some of her film noir favorites.

If you’re at all familiar with Amy Seimetz’s feature directorial debut Sun Don’t Shine, you won’t be surprised to learn that she has a penchant for dark, mentally unsettling stories, the kind that depict the more sinister and destructive tendencies of humanity. Naturally, she gravitates toward film noir and crime thrillers. Here are five Fandor titles in particular that Amy recommends.

1. The Hitch-hiker (1953), directed by Ida Lupino

The Hitch-hiker directed by Ida Lupino

“This film is contained and simple. I like simple plot set ups—put a crazy man in a car with innocent men and see what happens. I like how they allow tension to build based on character dynamics. I also like how they approach atmosphere and landscape in a road film.”

2. A Man, a Woman and a Killer (1975), directed by Rick Schmidt and Wayne Wang

A Man, a Woman and a Killer directed by Rick Schmidt and Wayne Wang

“I like that this is on the noir list. It plays with improvisation and scripted dialogue and form using familiar tropes. It’s definitely for the more experimentally minded (I hate saying that). It’s truly an independent film—$6,000 budget?”

3. Man Bait (1952), directed by Terence Fisher

Man Bait directed by Terence Fisher

“Could the title be more overt and the plot more contrived? It’s so true to form that the gymnastics the plot has to do to get a proper Femme Fatale is pretty fun.”

4. The Naked Kiss (1964), directed by Samuel Fuller

The Naked Kiss directed by Samuel Fuller

“This is quite progressive in my opinion. I personally love stories about “bad” women who don’t know how to be “good” women. The film plays around with a tricky subject that I think is still relevant yet rarely explored—once a whore, always a whore—excuse my crassness. It’s male paranoia at it’s best—”She is doing this to ruin my life! She can’t really want to help handicapped children AND be a whore!” It’s subject matter I rarely and sadly do not see explored often enough—the crux of being a complicated woman.”

5. Shoot to Kill (1947), directed by William Berke

Shoot to Kill directed by William Berke

“I love when movies open right in the middle of action—cut right to the chase—which literally means opening with a car chase in this film. The opening is so silly and abrupt but it hits the ground running. These kinds of openings are so confident that it immediately gains my trust for the director.”

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