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Inferno1980

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  • 3.8
A young woman stumbles upon a mysterious diary that reveals the secrets of the "Three Mothers" and unleashes a nightmare world of demonic evil. As the unstoppable horror spreads from Rome to New York City, this unholy trinity must be stopped before the world is submerged in the blood of the innocent. Written and directed by Dario Argento, INFERNO is the visually stunning second chapter of the "Three Mothers" trilogy begun with the classic SUSPIRIA. This surreal shocker stars Irene Miracle, Daria Nicolodi and Leigh McCloskey (and features a pulse-pounding original score by Keith Emerson of Emerson, Lake, and Palmer).

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3 members like this review

This movie doesn't make a lick of sense, but it doesn't really matter, does it? For Dario Argneto, effect is everything, style is king, and logical storytelling will always take a back seat to appearances.

INFERNO is the second part of his "Three Mothers" trilogy. SUSPIRIA is the first, and THE MOTHER OF TEARS (released a few years ago and starring Dario's daughter, Asia). You don't need to have seen SUSPIRIA to follow INFERNO (follow! Ha!), but if you do, you will notice the similarities they share in terms of visual style — especially the use of lighting. The use of reds and blues lend an almost comic book quality to the proceedings. There are moments when the lighting almost looks like it had been painted on the film itself. It is truly lovely to look at.

This film also has another Argento peccadillo: LOUD MUSICAL SOUNDTRACKS! The driving score is written by Keith Emerson of the 1970s prog rock band Emerson, Lake, and Palmer. At times, the music overwhelms what is happening on the screen. For instance, when Mark (Leigh McCloskey) is going into the depths of the building, the score is pulsating and shrieking as he descends...but it doesn't really add any suspense or drama to his actions. (The largest divide between music and action has to take place in Argento's PHENOMENA. I like Iron Maiden's "Flash of the Blade," but it doesn't really make Jennifer Connelly's running around a room any more interesting.) The lack of music near the beginning when Rose (Irene Miracle) searches the watery depths of a building is very effective making the scares that happen in this scene are the more shocking.

As with just about every other Argento film from this period, there are lots of great shots, cuts, and stylistic razzmatazz to enjoy in INFERNO. Like his hero, Edgar Allan Poe, Argento allows atmosphere and shocking imagery to carry the day regardless of logic and rationality. Watch this movie and relate to the goings-on as though they were part of a nightmare you were trapped in. Nightmares don't always make sense, but they're always exciting and chilling.

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top reviewer

Member Reviews (7)

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top reviewer

This movie doesn't make a lick of sense, but it doesn't really matter, does it? For Dario Argneto, effect is everything, style is king, and logical storytelling will always take a back seat to appearances.

INFERNO is the second part of his "Three Mothers" trilogy. SUSPIRIA is the first, and THE MOTHER OF TEARS (released a few years ago and starring Dario's daughter, Asia). You don't need to have seen SUSPIRIA to follow INFERNO (follow! Ha!), but if you do, you will notice the similarities they share in terms of visual style — especially the use of lighting. The use of reds and blues lend an almost comic book quality to the proceedings. There are moments when the lighting almost looks like it had been painted on the film itself. It is truly lovely to look at.

This film also has another Argento peccadillo: LOUD MUSICAL SOUNDTRACKS! The driving score is written by Keith Emerson of the 1970s prog rock band Emerson, Lake, and Palmer. At times, the music overwhelms what is happening on the screen. For instance, when Mark (Leigh McCloskey) is going into the depths of the building, the score is pulsating and shrieking as he descends...but it doesn't really add any suspense or drama to his actions. (The largest divide between music and action has to take place in Argento's PHENOMENA. I like Iron Maiden's "Flash of the Blade," but it doesn't really make Jennifer Connelly's running around a room any more interesting.) The lack of music near the beginning when Rose (Irene Miracle) searches the watery depths of a building is very effective making the scares that happen in this scene are the more shocking.

As with just about every other Argento film from this period, there are lots of great shots, cuts, and stylistic razzmatazz to enjoy in INFERNO. Like his hero, Edgar Allan Poe, Argento allows atmosphere and shocking imagery to carry the day regardless of logic and rationality. Watch this movie and relate to the goings-on as though they were part of a nightmare you were trapped in. Nightmares don't always make sense, but they're always exciting and chilling.

3 members like this review
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top reviewer

This is part of the 'Mother Of Tears' Trilogy by Argento. Most people will say that this doesn't make any sense. You are correct. Argento himself said that plot is always secondary in his films. The most important part is the kill scene. Fun fact - Whenever you see an arm with the infamous black glove, and nothing else, that's Argento. If your a seasoned fan of the horror genre, you will love this !

1 member likes this review
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top reviewer

It's a crying shame that there are viewers out there who claim that "nothing makes a lick of sense." This movie is not style over substance: it's the closest to a dream the horror cinema has ever given us. There's a haunting logic in flux in this film, for those able to experience it. It's Argento's prime masterpiece.

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top reviewer

so dumb

Yay.

Argento takes his demented and deeply flawed storytelling technique to a dizzying operatic high with this logic defying slice of bonkers. All the while filling your world with the most opulent imagery and astonishing soundtrack.

The big Italian mentalist.

Dario Argento's 'Inferno' is a confusing, beautiful mess. It is visceral in its violence and the burning colors which wash the film. I have no idea what the plot is, but apparently you should never steal library books.